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The Ultimate Guide To Embracing Your Eccentricity With Lydia Ross

Every vintage dresser knows the struggle. You go outside, and you suddenly are met with stares, people taking pictures, and various questions: "Why are you so dressed up?" "Are you doing a movie?" "Can I take a picture with you?" Etc. Not to mention some of the negative comments as well. It can be tiering. And sometimes, you will just want to revert back into jeans and a T-shirt. 

But then, you find yourself disliking yourself because you compromised who you are to please other people. The people who really care about you will accept you for who you really are - Not for who they want you to be. In this article, I interviewed Lydia Ross. A vintage fashion enthusiast from the UK and asked her about her vintage fashion journey. And her tips for embracing your eccentricity - Unapologetically.

Every vintage dresser knows the struggle. You go outside, and suddenly are met with stares, people taking pictures, and various questions. "Why are you so dressed up?" "Are you doing a movie?" "Can I take a picture with you?" Etc. Not to mention some of the negative comments swell. It can be tiering. And sometimes you will just want to revert back into jeans and a T-shirt. But then, you find yourself disliking yourself because you compromised who you are in oder to please other people. The people who really care about you will accept you for who you really are - Not for who they want you to be. In this article, I interviewed Lydia Ross. A vintage fashion enthusiast from London and asked her about her vintage fashion journey. And her tips for embracing your eccentricity - Unapologetically.    Tip 1: Find Yourself.  Q: How did you start dressing in vintage fashion? A: “I first started wearing '40s/'50s style clothes in my early 20s - I was introduced to it through some of my friends in the rockabilly and burlesque scene. At the time, it was so different. I loved mixing elegant styles of the '40s with piercings and tattoos; I loved the contrast. I began to get more into the burlesque scene, and started performing with a troupe from Leeds. Which made me lean towards '40s glamour. It’s been a progression from there and my interest stems further back now so I’m always researching fashion as far back as the 18th century."  Q: Your style is very eccentric. Have you always been this way? Was it kind of a style journey?   A: “Yes. Even as a kid. I had a huge dressing up box but was mainly my mom's old '80s horrors. Throughout school, I didn’t really dress individual; I was a loner. And I got bullied at school quite badly so didn’t want to draw any attention to myself - It was only when I left school that I started to express myself through my style. It was very rebellious at first. I shaved my hair into a Mohawk, got loads of piercings, and ripped all my clothes. (I had a lot of pent up feelings! )  My style progressed more towards Psychobilly and Rockabilly. As I got more into that scene, I started getting more tattoos around that time too. Eventually, I turned more towards original vintage mainly '50s and '40s if I could find anything. (This was before I even knew about buying online so had to rely on vintage shops and charity shops which were pretty good back then!)”   Q: Where are you originally from?  A: “I was born in Harrogate. I have lived in Manchester, but moved back to Harrogate - I do plan to move elsewhere in the future, perhaps somewhere with more opportunities.”  Tip 2: Stay True To Yourself.  Q: How do people usually react to the way you dress?  A: “It really depends what era I’m wearing. If I wear clothing from the '30s or '40s, It’s always positive. I get asked if I’m going to a wedding or the races. When I wear clothing from the '20s, it causes confusion and curiosity. If I wear Victorian or Edwardian, it’s either really positive or I get comments like ‘Mary Poppins’ because it’s just a little too much for small minds haha!“  Q: What’s your advice for women who want to embrace their eccentricity but are afraid of judgment?  A: “I completely understand the fear of stepping out in something you think will provoke attention. But it’s like anything new and unknown - The more you do it, the more you adapt. A lot of people tell me they would love to be as confident as me, and wear what they want. But they're too scared. You need to take the leap and break the mould! Now, I don’t care what reactions I get. I used to care. But, I’m at a point in my life where I can see the bigger picture. Peoples judgments and opinions really don't matter.”    Tip 3: Embrace Your New Style. (Unapologetically!) Q: What’s your style advice for women who’d like to dress the way you do?  A: “My style is about balance -  I like to have the right amount of accessories and a contrast or harmony of colours. Silhouette is something I like to have a balance with too. But that’s how my brain works. Style is a very personal thing.“ Q: You’ve collected real vintage clothing as well. What’s the most memorable thing you’ve collected so far?  A: “That is a tricky question! I have a few favorites. Firstly, my 1895 dress made from a brown twill with huge gigot sleeves and gold braid details; It needed a little fixing up, but that was such a good find! It’s so hard to get Victorian clothing that’s not black! Second is my 1940s ‘Fred A Block’ suits. They are covered in studs, and have different colour ways. I have a weakness for these suits. Third is one of my Victorian chatelaine’s, it has a  'fleur de lis' belt hook with four sewing related attachments, I collect them but this is by far my favorite yet!” Q: Anything else you’d like to share?  A: “If you’re interested in following our living history group we are called ‘The Extraordinary Victorians,’ you can find us on Facebook and Instagram.”

Tip 1: Find Yourself.

Q: How did you start dressing in vintage fashion?
A: “I first started wearing '40s/'50s style clothes in my early 20s - I was introduced to it through some of my friends in the rockabilly and burlesque scene. At the time, it was so different. I loved mixing elegant styles of the '40s with piercings and tattoos; I loved the contrast. I began to get more into the burlesque scene, and started performing with a troupe from Leeds. Which made me lean towards '40s glamour. It’s been a progression from there and my interest stems further back now so I’m always researching fashion as far back as the 18th century."

Q: Your style is very eccentric. Have you always been this way? Was it kind of a style journey? 

A: “Yes. Even as a kid. I had a huge dressing up box but was mainly my mom's old '80s horrors. Throughout school, I didn’t really dress individual; I was a loner. And I got bullied at school quite badly so didn’t want to draw any attention to myself - It was only when I left school that I started to express myself through my style. It was very rebellious at first. I shaved my hair into a Mohawk, got loads of piercings, and ripped all my clothes. (I had a lot of pent up feelings! )

My style progressed more towards Psychobilly and Rockabilly. As I got more into that scene, I started getting more tattoos around that time too. Eventually, I turned more towards original vintage mainly '50s and '40s if I could find anything. (This was before I even knew about buying online so had to rely on vintage shops and charity shops which were pretty good back then!)”

Every vintage dresser knows the struggle. You go outside, and suddenly are met with stares, people taking pictures, and various questions. "Why are you so dressed up?" "Are you doing a movie?" "Can I take a picture with you?" Etc. Not to mention some of the negative comments swell. It can be tiering. And sometimes you will just want to revert back into jeans and a T-shirt. But then, you find yourself disliking yourself because you compromised who you are in oder to please other people. The people who really care about you will accept you for who you really are - Not for who they want you to be. In this article, I interviewed Lydia Ross. A vintage fashion enthusiast from London and asked her about her vintage fashion journey. And her tips for embracing your eccentricity - Unapologetically.    Tip 1: Find Yourself.  Q: How did you start dressing in vintage fashion? A: “I first started wearing '40s/'50s style clothes in my early 20s - I was introduced to it through some of my friends in the rockabilly and burlesque scene. At the time, it was so different. I loved mixing elegant styles of the '40s with piercings and tattoos; I loved the contrast. I began to get more into the burlesque scene, and started performing with a troupe from Leeds. Which made me lean towards '40s glamour. It’s been a progression from there and my interest stems further back now so I’m always researching fashion as far back as the 18th century."  Q: Your style is very eccentric. Have you always been this way? Was it kind of a style journey?   A: “Yes. Even as a kid. I had a huge dressing up box but was mainly my mom's old '80s horrors. Throughout school, I didn’t really dress individual; I was a loner. And I got bullied at school quite badly so didn’t want to draw any attention to myself - It was only when I left school that I started to express myself through my style. It was very rebellious at first. I shaved my hair into a Mohawk, got loads of piercings, and ripped all my clothes. (I had a lot of pent up feelings! )  My style progressed more towards Psychobilly and Rockabilly. As I got more into that scene, I started getting more tattoos around that time too. Eventually, I turned more towards original vintage mainly '50s and '40s if I could find anything. (This was before I even knew about buying online so had to rely on vintage shops and charity shops which were pretty good back then!)”   Q: Where are you originally from?  A: “I was born in Harrogate. I have lived in Manchester, but moved back to Harrogate - I do plan to move elsewhere in the future, perhaps somewhere with more opportunities.”  Tip 2: Stay True To Yourself.  Q: How do people usually react to the way you dress?  A: “It really depends what era I’m wearing. If I wear clothing from the '30s or '40s, It’s always positive. I get asked if I’m going to a wedding or the races. When I wear clothing from the '20s, it causes confusion and curiosity. If I wear Victorian or Edwardian, it’s either really positive or I get comments like ‘Mary Poppins’ because it’s just a little too much for small minds haha!“  Q: What’s your advice for women who want to embrace their eccentricity but are afraid of judgment?  A: “I completely understand the fear of stepping out in something you think will provoke attention. But it’s like anything new and unknown - The more you do it, the more you adapt. A lot of people tell me they would love to be as confident as me, and wear what they want. But they're too scared. You need to take the leap and break the mould! Now, I don’t care what reactions I get. I used to care. But, I’m at a point in my life where I can see the bigger picture. Peoples judgments and opinions really don't matter.”    Tip 3: Embrace Your New Style. (Unapologetically!) Q: What’s your style advice for women who’d like to dress the way you do?  A: “My style is about balance -  I like to have the right amount of accessories and a contrast or harmony of colours. Silhouette is something I like to have a balance with too. But that’s how my brain works. Style is a very personal thing.“ Q: You’ve collected real vintage clothing as well. What’s the most memorable thing you’ve collected so far?  A: “That is a tricky question! I have a few favorites. Firstly, my 1895 dress made from a brown twill with huge gigot sleeves and gold braid details; It needed a little fixing up, but that was such a good find! It’s so hard to get Victorian clothing that’s not black! Second is my 1940s ‘Fred A Block’ suits. They are covered in studs, and have different colour ways. I have a weakness for these suits. Third is one of my Victorian chatelaine’s, it has a  'fleur de lis' belt hook with four sewing related attachments, I collect them but this is by far my favorite yet!” Q: Anything else you’d like to share?  A: “If you’re interested in following our living history group we are called ‘The Extraordinary Victorians,’ you can find us on Facebook and Instagram.”
Q: Where are you originally from? 
A: “I was born in Harrogate. I have lived in Manchester, but moved back to Harrogate - I do plan to move elsewhere in the future - Perhaps somewhere with more opportunities.”

Tip 2: Stay True To Yourself.

Q: How do people usually react to the way you dress?

A: “It really depends what era I’m wearing. If I wear clothing from the '30s or '40s, It’s always positive. I get asked if I’m going to a wedding or the races. When I wear clothing from the '20s, it causes confusion and curiosity. If I wear Victorian or Edwardian, it’s either really positive or I get comments like ‘Mary Poppins’ because it’s just a little too much for small minds haha!“


Q: What’s your advice for women who want to embrace their eccentricity but are afraid of judgment?


A: “I completely understand the fear of stepping out in something you think will provoke attention. But it’s like anything new and unknown - The more you do it, the more you adapt. A lot of people tell me they would love to be as confident as me, and wear what they want. But they're too scared. You need to take the leap and break the mould! Now, I don’t care what reactions I get. I used to care. But, I’m at a point in my life where I can see the bigger picture. Peoples judgments and opinions really don't matter.”


Every vintage dresser knows the struggle. You go outside, and suddenly are met with stares, people taking pictures, and various questions. "Why are you so dressed up?" "Are you doing a movie?" "Can I take a picture with you?" Etc. Not to mention some of the negative comments swell. It can be tiering. And sometimes you will just want to revert back into jeans and a T-shirt. But then, you find yourself disliking yourself because you compromised who you are in oder to please other people. The people who really care about you will accept you for who you really are - Not for who they want you to be. In this article, I interviewed Lydia Ross. A vintage fashion enthusiast from London and asked her about her vintage fashion journey. And her tips for embracing your eccentricity - Unapologetically.    Tip 1: Find Yourself.  Q: How did you start dressing in vintage fashion? A: “I first started wearing '40s/'50s style clothes in my early 20s - I was introduced to it through some of my friends in the rockabilly and burlesque scene. At the time, it was so different. I loved mixing elegant styles of the '40s with piercings and tattoos; I loved the contrast. I began to get more into the burlesque scene, and started performing with a troupe from Leeds. Which made me lean towards '40s glamour. It’s been a progression from there and my interest stems further back now so I’m always researching fashion as far back as the 18th century."  Q: Your style is very eccentric. Have you always been this way? Was it kind of a style journey?   A: “Yes. Even as a kid. I had a huge dressing up box but was mainly my mom's old '80s horrors. Throughout school, I didn’t really dress individual; I was a loner. And I got bullied at school quite badly so didn’t want to draw any attention to myself - It was only when I left school that I started to express myself through my style. It was very rebellious at first. I shaved my hair into a Mohawk, got loads of piercings, and ripped all my clothes. (I had a lot of pent up feelings! )  My style progressed more towards Psychobilly and Rockabilly. As I got more into that scene, I started getting more tattoos around that time too. Eventually, I turned more towards original vintage mainly '50s and '40s if I could find anything. (This was before I even knew about buying online so had to rely on vintage shops and charity shops which were pretty good back then!)”   Q: Where are you originally from?  A: “I was born in Harrogate. I have lived in Manchester, but moved back to Harrogate - I do plan to move elsewhere in the future, perhaps somewhere with more opportunities.”  Tip 2: Stay True To Yourself.  Q: How do people usually react to the way you dress?  A: “It really depends what era I’m wearing. If I wear clothing from the '30s or '40s, It’s always positive. I get asked if I’m going to a wedding or the races. When I wear clothing from the '20s, it causes confusion and curiosity. If I wear Victorian or Edwardian, it’s either really positive or I get comments like ‘Mary Poppins’ because it’s just a little too much for small minds haha!“  Q: What’s your advice for women who want to embrace their eccentricity but are afraid of judgment?  A: “I completely understand the fear of stepping out in something you think will provoke attention. But it’s like anything new and unknown - The more you do it, the more you adapt. A lot of people tell me they would love to be as confident as me, and wear what they want. But they're too scared. You need to take the leap and break the mould! Now, I don’t care what reactions I get. I used to care. But, I’m at a point in my life where I can see the bigger picture. Peoples judgments and opinions really don't matter.”    Tip 3: Embrace Your New Style. (Unapologetically!) Q: What’s your style advice for women who’d like to dress the way you do?  A: “My style is about balance -  I like to have the right amount of accessories and a contrast or harmony of colours. Silhouette is something I like to have a balance with too. But that’s how my brain works. Style is a very personal thing.“ Q: You’ve collected real vintage clothing as well. What’s the most memorable thing you’ve collected so far?  A: “That is a tricky question! I have a few favorites. Firstly, my 1895 dress made from a brown twill with huge gigot sleeves and gold braid details; It needed a little fixing up, but that was such a good find! It’s so hard to get Victorian clothing that’s not black! Second is my 1940s ‘Fred A Block’ suits. They are covered in studs, and have different colour ways. I have a weakness for these suits. Third is one of my Victorian chatelaine’s, it has a  'fleur de lis' belt hook with four sewing related attachments, I collect them but this is by far my favorite yet!” Q: Anything else you’d like to share?  A: “If you’re interested in following our living history group we are called ‘The Extraordinary Victorians,’ you can find us on Facebook and Instagram.”

Tip 3: Embrace Your New Style. (Unapologetically!)

Q: What’s your style advice for women who’d like to dress the way you do?

A: “My style is about balance -  I like to have the right amount of accessories and a contrast or harmony of colours. Silhouette is something I like to have a balance with too. But that’s how my brain works. Style is a very personal thing.“

Q: You’ve collected real vintage clothing as well. What’s the most memorable thing you’ve collected so far?

A: “That is a tricky question! I have a few favorites. Firstly, my 1895 dress made from a brown twill with huge gigot sleeves and gold braid details; It needed a little fixing up, but that was such a good find! It’s so hard to get Victorian clothing that’s not black! Second is my 1940s ‘Fred A Block’ suits. They are covered in studs, and have different colour ways. I have a weakness for these suits. Third is one of my Victorian chatelaine’s, it has a  'fleur de lis' belt hook with four sewing related attachments, I collect them but this is by far my favorite yet!”

Q: Anything else you’d like to share?

A: “If you’re interested in following our living history group we are called ‘The Extraordinary Victorians.’ You can find us on Facebook and Instagram.”

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