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Fit For A Queen: Her Majesty’s Milliner Rachel Trevor Morgan Talks All Things Headwear

Headwear is very important in the vintage fashion community; it often adds that last dramatic touch that is needed to make the outfit come all together. Many women don’t know the first thing about headwear, or how to wear it.

Headwear (more specifically hats) is dated as far back as the late 1800s. They were used more for necessity rather than a fashion statement. Even though many would assume otherwise, due to their extravagant designs.

They went in and out of style for a while until their popularity seemed to plummet in the ‘60s. They are now often only worn in churches for religious reasons or in the winter for necessity.

I spoke to Rachel Trevor-Morgan, a Milliner granted a Royal Warrant to design for the Royal family.  I wanted to know how she felt about hats not being as popular as they once were, and the advice she has for women who want to start wearing them.

Headwear is very important in the vintage fashion community; It often adds that last dramatic touch that is needed to make the outfit come all together - but many women don’t know the first thing about headwear, or how to wear it.  Headwear (more specifically hats) are dated as far back as the late 1800s. They were used more for necessity rather than a fashion statement. Even though many would assume otherwise do to their extravagant designs.  They went in and out of style for a while until their popularity seemed to plummet in the ‘60s. They are are now often only worn in churches for religious reasons or in the winter for necessity.  I spoke to Rachel Trevor-Morgan; a Milliner granted a Royal warrant to design for the Royal family -  I wanted to know how she felt about hats not being as popular as they once were and the advice she has for women who want to start wearing them.   Q: You first fell in love with headwear seeing your mother wearing them to church; How do you feel about how hats not being as commonly worn nowadays? not even at church? (At least here in the U.S.)   A: “I know it’s not realistic to think that hats are going to return as everyday wear anytime soon but it is a great shame that we have largely lost the art of dressing in a way that we feel comfortable with hats. We are all so much less formal so women all too often feel anxious about standing out - they needn’t, a hat doesn’t need to be a huge statement piece with too much fuss. In fact, I think the simplest of designs can make a huge impact. and add mystery and glamour to any look.”   Q: You originally had an interest in acting and theatre wear, how did your love for theatre lead you to becoming interested in headwear? Have you ever wanted to branch out to designing clothing?  A: “I think it was a sense of drama that lead me to hats. It is true that I wanted to work in the theatre, it was the whole wonderful creative feeling that a theatre produces. I might have been tempted by clothing but somehow that seemed such a huge industry with so much competition. The millinery business is small by comparison. The wonderful thing about hats is that it is fashion, art, craft and anything is possible.”  Q: How do you feel about millinery not being as widely known and appreciated as it once was?  A: “Here in the UK, whilst women might not be wearing so many hats, it is still a very relevant industry. Of course, we have the British ‘Season’ - Royal Ascot and The Derby (Horse racing), Henley (Rowing), Royal Garden Parties…all events that still require hats to be worn.  We also have the Royal family who are great advocates of hat wearing and have great influence. Additionally, Millinery seems to be having a bit of a renaissance with the magazines, whereas there have been years when you would hardly see a hat in the fashion pages, they are all over the latest shoots. We are having a lot of interest and call-ins from US magazines too. Our US client base is growing year on  year which is very exciting.”    Q: You’ve trained with Graham Smith, how was it like training with him? And what’s one of the biggest takeaways you got from working with him?  A: “The craft. He was a master of his art and admired by his clients and fellow milliners alike. His style was understated, glamorous and elegant. I was definitely influenced by him and think that my design ethos has its roots in his workroom.”  Q: What type of hat do you recommend for women who are just starting to wear hats?  A: “One that they feel comfortable in and yet gives them that frisson of excitement when they put it on their head. Each person is different, and styles vary for different occasions so it’s difficult to be very prescriptive. My advice would be don’t be apologetic, be as bold as you are comfortably able to be!”  Q: Your designs very timeless and classic, is that something you try to re -create or does it just come naturally to you?  A:” It is a natural place for me. I feel very privileged to be able to design the hats I want to make; it is of course important to move forward with each collection, but I want clients to look beautiful and elegant. A timeless design does that.”    Q: You are known for designing Hats for Her Majesty. In your opinion, which is the best and why?  A: “The Queen has a fabulous style. Over the years she has worn some really fashion forward hats. Right now, I think she has found a perfect style of hat which works very well for her. Her outfits are meticulously thought out and I love the fact that everything coordinates. We have a lot of fun matching flowers and trimmings to the beautiful prints she wears. I feel very privileged to be making  her hats.”  Q: Your latest collection is out now, what was your inspiration for this collection?   A: “We are now working on our SS20 collection. We always take a lot of influences from flowers and the natural world. The colours and combinations are an endless source of inspiration. I have a wonderful flower maker who has worked for me for many years, we are always looking for new interpretations. This is my focus for the new collection.”  Q: You’ve worked with many designers throughout the years, who has influenced or inspired you the most?  A: “Actually, my biggest influences have always come from a time past …Dior, Schiaparelli. Designers of the ‘40’s and ‘50’s, the Golden Age of couture. Styles were so beautiful and timeless. Hats were worn with style and ease.”      Q: You’ve also designed for other members of the royal family, such as The Duchess of Cambridge; How do their design preference differ from the other?   A: “I am very privileged to have made hats for many members of the Royal family. Of course, whilst they are royalty, their considerations are just like any other client - occasion, style, age. They are in the public eye you want them to feel perfectly dressed for whatever occasion they are attending.”  Q: You make all the colours for your hats in a saucepan to ensure you get the perfect colour, you also tailor make each hat for your clients, do you enjoy the process? And do you think it gives your designs a special personal touch?    A: “Yes, it is true that we spoon dye all our straws and fabrics. We make bespoke hats to order and dyeing our colours allows us to make unique pieces for each client’s requirements. Sometimes flowers for a hat can mean dying many subtle shades to create the perfect spray of flowers … this is the kind of detail that we love!”   Q: Are there any up and coming projects we can look forward to?  A: “Next year will mark my 30 years in business…there will be a lot going on so watch this space!!”

Q: You first fell in love with headwear seeing your mother wearing them to church. How do you feel about how hats not being as commonly worn nowadays? Not even at church? (At least here in the U.S.) 

A: “I know it’s not realistic to think that hats are going to return as everyday wear anytime soon but it is a great shame that we have largely lost the art of dressing in a way that we feel comfortable with hats. We are all so much less formal so women all too often feel anxious about standing out - they needn’t, a hat doesn’t need to be a huge statement piece with too much fuss. In fact, I think the simplest of designs can make a huge impact. and add mystery and glamour to any look.”


Q: You originally had an interest in acting and theatre wear. How did your love for theatre lead you to becoming interested in headwear? Have you ever wanted to branch out to designing clothing?

A: “I think it was a sense of drama that lead me to hats. It is true that I wanted to work in the theatre, it was the whole wonderful creative feeling that a theatre produces. I might have been tempted by clothing but somehow that seemed such a huge industry with so much competition. The millinery business is small by comparison. The wonderful thing about hats is that it is fashion, art, craft and anything is possible.”

Q: How do you feel about millinery not being as widely known and appreciated as it once was?

A: “Here in the UK, whilst women might not be wearing so many hats, it is still a very relevant industry. Of course, we have the British ‘Season’ - Royal Ascot and The Derby (Horse racing), Henley (Rowing), Royal Garden Parties…all events that still require hats to be worn.  We also have the Royal family who are great advocates of hat wearing and have great influence. Additionally, Millinery seems to be having a bit of a renaissance with the magazines, whereas there have been years when you would hardly see a hat in the fashion pages, they are all over the latest shoots. We are having a lot of interest and call-ins from US magazines too. Our US client base is growing year on year - which is very exciting.”

Headwear is very important in the vintage fashion community; It often adds that last dramatic touch that is needed to make the outfit come all together - but many women don’t know the first thing about headwear, or how to wear it.  Headwear (more specifically hats) are dated as far back as the late 1800s. They were used more for necessity rather than a fashion statement. Even though many would assume otherwise do to their extravagant designs.  They went in and out of style for a while until their popularity seemed to plummet in the ‘60s. They are are now often only worn in churches for religious reasons or in the winter for necessity.  I spoke to Rachel Trevor-Morgan; a Milliner granted a Royal warrant to design for the Royal family -  I wanted to know how she felt about hats not being as popular as they once were and the advice she has for women who want to start wearing them.  Q: You first fell in love with headwear seeing your mother wearing them to church; How do you feel about how hats not being as commonly worn nowadays? not even at church? (At least here in the U.S.)   A: “I know it’s not realistic to think that hats are going to return as everyday wear anytime soon but it is a great shame that we have largely lost the art of dressing in a way that we feel comfortable with hats. We are all so much less formal so women all too often feel anxious about standing out - they needn’t, a hat doesn’t need to be a huge statement piece with too much fuss. In fact, I think the simplest of designs can make a huge impact. and add mystery and glamour to any look.”     Q: You originally had an interest in acting and theatre wear, how did your love for theatre lead you to becoming interested in headwear? Have you ever wanted to branch out to designing clothing?  A: “I think it was a sense of drama that lead me to hats. It is true that I wanted to work in the theatre, it was the whole wonderful creative feeling that a theatre produces. I might have been tempted by clothing but somehow that seemed such a huge industry with so much competition. The millinery business is small by comparison. The wonderful thing about hats is that it is fashion, art, craft and anything is possible.”   Q: How do you feel about millinery not being as widely known and appreciated as it once was?  A: “Here in the UK, whilst women might not be wearing so many hats, it is still a very relevant industry. Of course, we have the British ‘Season’ - Royal Ascot and The Derby (Horse racing), Henley (Rowing), Royal Garden Parties…all events that still require hats to be worn.  We also have the Royal family who are great advocates of hat wearing and have great influence. Additionally, Millinery seems to be having a bit of a renaissance with the magazines, whereas there have been years when you would hardly see a hat in the fashion pages, they are all over the latest shoots. We are having a lot of interest and call-ins from US magazines too. Our US client base is growing year on year which is very exciting.”     Q: You’ve trained with Graham Smith, how was it like training with him? And what’s one of the biggest takeaways you got from working with him?  A: “The craft. He was a master of his art and admired by his clients and fellow milliners alike. His style was understated, glamorous and elegant. I was definitely influenced by him and think that my design ethos has its roots in his workroom.”   Q: What type of hat do you recommend for women who are just starting to wear hats?  A: “One that they feel comfortable in and yet gives them that frisson of excitement when they put it on their head. Each person is different, and styles vary for different occasions so it’s difficult to be very prescriptive. My advice would be don’t be apologetic, be as bold as you are comfortably able to be!”   Q: Your designs very timeless and classic, is that something you try to re -create or does it just come naturally to you?  A: It is a natural place for me. I feel very privileged to be able to design the hats I want to make; it is of course important to move forward with each collection, but I want clients to look beautiful and elegant. A timeless design does that.   Q: You are known for designing Hats for Her Majesty. In your opinion, which is the best and why?  A: “The Queen has a fabulous style. Over the years she has worn some really fashion forward hats. Right now, I think she has found a perfect style of hat which works very well for her. Her outfits are meticulously thought out and I love the fact that everything coordinates. We have a lot of fun matching flowers and trimmings to the beautiful prints she wears. I feel very privileged to be making her hats.”   Q: Your latest collection is out now, what was your inspiration for this collection?   A: We are now working on our SS20 collection. We always take a lot of influences from flowers and the natural world. The colours and combinations are an endless source of inspiration. I have a wonderful flower maker who has worked for me for many years, we are always looking for new interpretations. This is my focus for the new collection.   Q: You’ve worked with many designers throughout the years, who has influenced or inspired you the most?  A: “Actually, my biggest influences have always come from a time past …Dior, Schiaparelli. Designers of the ‘40’s and ‘50’s, the Golden Age of couture. Styles were so beautiful and timeless. Hats were worn with style and ease.”   Q: You’ve also designed for other members of the royal family, such as The Duchess of Cambridge; How do their design preference differ from the other?   A: “I am very privileged to have made hats for many members of the Royal family. Of course, whilst they are royalty, their considerations are just like any other client - occasion, style, age. They are in the public eye you want them to feel perfectly dressed for whatever occasion they are attending.”   Q: You make all the colours for your hats in a saucepan to ensure you get the perfect colour, you also tailor make each hat for your clients, do you enjoy the process? And do you think it gives your designs a special personal touch?    A: Yes, it is true that we spoon dye all our straws and fabrics. We make bespoke hats to order and dyeing our colours allows us to make unique pieces for each client’s requirements. Sometimes flowers for a hat can mean dying many subtle shades to create the perfect spray of flowers … this is the kind of detail that we love!     Q: Are there any up and coming projects we can look forward to?   A: “Next year will mark my 30 years in business…there will be a lot going on so watch this space!!”

Q: You’ve trained with Graham Smith. How was it like training with him? And what was one of the biggest takeaways you got from working with him?

A: “The craft. He was a master of his art and admired by his clients and fellow milliners alike. His style was understated, glamorous and elegant. I was definitely influenced by him and think that my design ethos has its roots in his workroom.”

Q: What type of hat do you recommend for women who are just starting to wear hats?

A: “One that they feel comfortable in and yet gives them that frisson of excitement when they put it on their head. Each person is different, and styles vary for different occasions so it’s difficult to be very prescriptive. My advice would be don’t be apologetic, be as bold as you are comfortably able to be!”

Q: Your designs are very timeless and classic. Is that something you try to recreate? Or does it just come naturally to you?

A:” It is a natural place for me. I feel very privileged to be able to design the hats I want to make; it is of course important to move forward with each collection, but I want clients to look beautiful and elegant. A timeless design does that.”

Headwear is very important in the vintage fashion community; It often adds that last dramatic touch that is needed to make the outfit come all together - but many women don’t know the first thing about headwear, or how to wear it.  Headwear (more specifically hats) are dated as far back as the late 1800s. They were used more for necessity rather than a fashion statement. Even though many would assume otherwise do to their extravagant designs.  They went in and out of style for a while until their popularity seemed to plummet in the ‘60s. They are are now often only worn in churches for religious reasons or in the winter for necessity.  I spoke to Rachel Trevor-Morgan; a Milliner granted a Royal warrant to design for the Royal family -  I wanted to know how she felt about hats not being as popular as they once were and the advice she has for women who want to start wearing them.  Q: You first fell in love with headwear seeing your mother wearing them to church; How do you feel about how hats not being as commonly worn nowadays? not even at church? (At least here in the U.S.)   A: “I know it’s not realistic to think that hats are going to return as everyday wear anytime soon but it is a great shame that we have largely lost the art of dressing in a way that we feel comfortable with hats. We are all so much less formal so women all too often feel anxious about standing out - they needn’t, a hat doesn’t need to be a huge statement piece with too much fuss. In fact, I think the simplest of designs can make a huge impact. and add mystery and glamour to any look.”     Q: You originally had an interest in acting and theatre wear, how did your love for theatre lead you to becoming interested in headwear? Have you ever wanted to branch out to designing clothing?  A: “I think it was a sense of drama that lead me to hats. It is true that I wanted to work in the theatre, it was the whole wonderful creative feeling that a theatre produces. I might have been tempted by clothing but somehow that seemed such a huge industry with so much competition. The millinery business is small by comparison. The wonderful thing about hats is that it is fashion, art, craft and anything is possible.”   Q: How do you feel about millinery not being as widely known and appreciated as it once was?  A: “Here in the UK, whilst women might not be wearing so many hats, it is still a very relevant industry. Of course, we have the British ‘Season’ - Royal Ascot and The Derby (Horse racing), Henley (Rowing), Royal Garden Parties…all events that still require hats to be worn.  We also have the Royal family who are great advocates of hat wearing and have great influence. Additionally, Millinery seems to be having a bit of a renaissance with the magazines, whereas there have been years when you would hardly see a hat in the fashion pages, they are all over the latest shoots. We are having a lot of interest and call-ins from US magazines too. Our US client base is growing year on year which is very exciting.”     Q: You’ve trained with Graham Smith, how was it like training with him? And what’s one of the biggest takeaways you got from working with him?  A: “The craft. He was a master of his art and admired by his clients and fellow milliners alike. His style was understated, glamorous and elegant. I was definitely influenced by him and think that my design ethos has its roots in his workroom.”   Q: What type of hat do you recommend for women who are just starting to wear hats?  A: “One that they feel comfortable in and yet gives them that frisson of excitement when they put it on their head. Each person is different, and styles vary for different occasions so it’s difficult to be very prescriptive. My advice would be don’t be apologetic, be as bold as you are comfortably able to be!”   Q: Your designs very timeless and classic, is that something you try to re -create or does it just come naturally to you?  A: It is a natural place for me. I feel very privileged to be able to design the hats I want to make; it is of course important to move forward with each collection, but I want clients to look beautiful and elegant. A timeless design does that.   Q: You are known for designing Hats for Her Majesty. In your opinion, which is the best and why?  A: “The Queen has a fabulous style. Over the years she has worn some really fashion forward hats. Right now, I think she has found a perfect style of hat which works very well for her. Her outfits are meticulously thought out and I love the fact that everything coordinates. We have a lot of fun matching flowers and trimmings to the beautiful prints she wears. I feel very privileged to be making her hats.”   Q: Your latest collection is out now, what was your inspiration for this collection?   A: We are now working on our SS20 collection. We always take a lot of influences from flowers and the natural world. The colours and combinations are an endless source of inspiration. I have a wonderful flower maker who has worked for me for many years, we are always looking for new interpretations. This is my focus for the new collection.   Q: You’ve worked with many designers throughout the years, who has influenced or inspired you the most?  A: “Actually, my biggest influences have always come from a time past …Dior, Schiaparelli. Designers of the ‘40’s and ‘50’s, the Golden Age of couture. Styles were so beautiful and timeless. Hats were worn with style and ease.”   Q: You’ve also designed for other members of the royal family, such as The Duchess of Cambridge; How do their design preference differ from the other?   A: “I am very privileged to have made hats for many members of the Royal family. Of course, whilst they are royalty, their considerations are just like any other client - occasion, style, age. They are in the public eye you want them to feel perfectly dressed for whatever occasion they are attending.”   Q: You make all the colours for your hats in a saucepan to ensure you get the perfect colour, you also tailor make each hat for your clients, do you enjoy the process? And do you think it gives your designs a special personal touch?    A: Yes, it is true that we spoon dye all our straws and fabrics. We make bespoke hats to order and dyeing our colours allows us to make unique pieces for each client’s requirements. Sometimes flowers for a hat can mean dying many subtle shades to create the perfect spray of flowers … this is the kind of detail that we love!     Q: Are there any up and coming projects we can look forward to?   A: “Next year will mark my 30 years in business…there will be a lot going on so watch this space!!”

Q: You are known for designing hats for Her Majesty. In your opinion, which is the best and why?

A: “The Queen has a fabulous style. Over the years she has worn some really fashion forward hats. Right now, I think she has found a perfect style of hat which works very well for her. Her outfits are meticulously thought out and I love the fact that everything coordinates. We have a lot of fun matching flowers and trimmings to the beautiful prints she wears. I feel very privileged to be making her hats.”

Q: Your latest collection is out now, what was your inspiration for this collection? 

A: “We are now working on our SS20 collection. We always take a lot of influences from flowers and the natural world. The colours and combinations are an endless source of inspiration. I have a wonderful flower maker who has worked for me for many years, we are always looking for new interpretations. This is my focus for the new collection.”

Q: You’ve worked with many designers throughout the years. Who has influenced or inspired you the most?

A: “Actually, my biggest influences have always come from a time past …Dior, Schiaparelli. Designers of the ‘40’s and ‘50’s, the Golden Age of couture. Styles were so beautiful and timeless. Hats were worn with style and ease.”

Headwear is very important in the vintage fashion community; It often adds that last dramatic touch that is needed to make the outfit come all together - but many women don’t know the first thing about headwear, or how to wear it.  Headwear (more specifically hats) are dated as far back as the late 1800s. They were used more for necessity rather than a fashion statement. Even though many would assume otherwise do to their extravagant designs.  They went in and out of style for a while until their popularity seemed to plummet in the ‘60s. They are are now often only worn in churches for religious reasons or in the winter for necessity.  I spoke to Rachel Trevor-Morgan; a Milliner granted a Royal warrant to design for the Royal family -  I wanted to know how she felt about hats not being as popular as they once were and the advice she has for women who want to start wearing them.  Q: You first fell in love with headwear seeing your mother wearing them to church; How do you feel about how hats not being as commonly worn nowadays? not even at church? (At least here in the U.S.)   A: “I know it’s not realistic to think that hats are going to return as everyday wear anytime soon but it is a great shame that we have largely lost the art of dressing in a way that we feel comfortable with hats. We are all so much less formal so women all too often feel anxious about standing out - they needn’t, a hat doesn’t need to be a huge statement piece with too much fuss. In fact, I think the simplest of designs can make a huge impact. and add mystery and glamour to any look.”     Q: You originally had an interest in acting and theatre wear, how did your love for theatre lead you to becoming interested in headwear? Have you ever wanted to branch out to designing clothing?  A: “I think it was a sense of drama that lead me to hats. It is true that I wanted to work in the theatre, it was the whole wonderful creative feeling that a theatre produces. I might have been tempted by clothing but somehow that seemed such a huge industry with so much competition. The millinery business is small by comparison. The wonderful thing about hats is that it is fashion, art, craft and anything is possible.”   Q: How do you feel about millinery not being as widely known and appreciated as it once was?  A: “Here in the UK, whilst women might not be wearing so many hats, it is still a very relevant industry. Of course, we have the British ‘Season’ - Royal Ascot and The Derby (Horse racing), Henley (Rowing), Royal Garden Parties…all events that still require hats to be worn.  We also have the Royal family who are great advocates of hat wearing and have great influence. Additionally, Millinery seems to be having a bit of a renaissance with the magazines, whereas there have been years when you would hardly see a hat in the fashion pages, they are all over the latest shoots. We are having a lot of interest and call-ins from US magazines too. Our US client base is growing year on year which is very exciting.”     Q: You’ve trained with Graham Smith, how was it like training with him? And what’s one of the biggest takeaways you got from working with him?  A: “The craft. He was a master of his art and admired by his clients and fellow milliners alike. His style was understated, glamorous and elegant. I was definitely influenced by him and think that my design ethos has its roots in his workroom.”   Q: What type of hat do you recommend for women who are just starting to wear hats?  A: “One that they feel comfortable in and yet gives them that frisson of excitement when they put it on their head. Each person is different, and styles vary for different occasions so it’s difficult to be very prescriptive. My advice would be don’t be apologetic, be as bold as you are comfortably able to be!”   Q: Your designs very timeless and classic, is that something you try to re -create or does it just come naturally to you?  A: It is a natural place for me. I feel very privileged to be able to design the hats I want to make; it is of course important to move forward with each collection, but I want clients to look beautiful and elegant. A timeless design does that.   Q: You are known for designing Hats for Her Majesty. In your opinion, which is the best and why?  A: “The Queen has a fabulous style. Over the years she has worn some really fashion forward hats. Right now, I think she has found a perfect style of hat which works very well for her. Her outfits are meticulously thought out and I love the fact that everything coordinates. We have a lot of fun matching flowers and trimmings to the beautiful prints she wears. I feel very privileged to be making her hats.”   Q: Your latest collection is out now, what was your inspiration for this collection?   A: We are now working on our SS20 collection. We always take a lot of influences from flowers and the natural world. The colours and combinations are an endless source of inspiration. I have a wonderful flower maker who has worked for me for many years, we are always looking for new interpretations. This is my focus for the new collection.   Q: You’ve worked with many designers throughout the years, who has influenced or inspired you the most?  A: “Actually, my biggest influences have always come from a time past …Dior, Schiaparelli. Designers of the ‘40’s and ‘50’s, the Golden Age of couture. Styles were so beautiful and timeless. Hats were worn with style and ease.”   Q: You’ve also designed for other members of the royal family, such as The Duchess of Cambridge; How do their design preference differ from the other?   A: “I am very privileged to have made hats for many members of the Royal family. Of course, whilst they are royalty, their considerations are just like any other client - occasion, style, age. They are in the public eye you want them to feel perfectly dressed for whatever occasion they are attending.”   Q: You make all the colours for your hats in a saucepan to ensure you get the perfect colour, you also tailor make each hat for your clients, do you enjoy the process? And do you think it gives your designs a special personal touch?    A: Yes, it is true that we spoon dye all our straws and fabrics. We make bespoke hats to order and dyeing our colours allows us to make unique pieces for each client’s requirements. Sometimes flowers for a hat can mean dying many subtle shades to create the perfect spray of flowers … this is the kind of detail that we love!     Q: Are there any up and coming projects we can look forward to?   A: “Next year will mark my 30 years in business…there will be a lot going on so watch this space!!”

Q: You’ve also designed for other members of the royal family; such as The Duchess of Cambridge. How do their design preference differ from the other? 

A: “I am very privileged to have made hats for many members of the Royal family. Of course, whilst they are royalty, their considerations are just like any other client - occasion, style, age. They are in the public eye you want them to feel perfectly dressed for whatever occasion they are attending.”

Q: You make all the colors for your hats in a saucepan to ensure you get the perfect color, you also tailor make each hat for your clients. Do you enjoy the process? And do you think it gives your designs a special personal touch?  

A: “Yes, it is true that we spoon dye all our straws and fabrics. We make bespoke hats to order and dyeing our colours allows us to make unique pieces for each client’s requirements. Sometimes flowers for a hat can mean dying many subtle shades to create the perfect spray of flowers … this is the kind of detail that we love!”

Q: Are there any up and coming projects we can look forward to?

A: “Next year will mark my 30 years in business…there will be a lot going on so watch this space!!”

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