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A look Into The Glamorous History Of Turbans With Eini Immonen

Turbans are dated back to as far as the 18th century. In the 1940s, they were worn by everyone: from celebrities, to normal everyday women. When access to everyday things such as shampoo, conditioner, or hairdressers were limited. In Old-Hollywood, turbans were often worn as a fashion statement rather than necessity. French milliner Madame Paulette, is often credited for bringing turbans back into style during the ‘40s  

Turbans were popular in the '50s as well, but were adapted to accommodate bouffant style hairstyles. Finding turbans with such classic and timeless designs of those past eras of fashion is nearly impossible nowadays - Or so I thought. Until one day I found an Etsy shop located Finland that recreated turbans from the '40s - '50s. I spoke to the owner: Eini Immonen. A milliner that wears turbans almost daily about her designs and why she deiced to dedicate her craft to turbans.

Turbans are dated back to as far as the 18th century. In the 1940s, they were worn by everyone: from celebrities, to normal everyday women. When access to everyday things such as shampoo, conditioner, or hairdressers necesites was limited. In Old-Hollywood, turbans were often worn as a fashion statement rather than necessity. French milliner Madame Paulette, is often credited for bringing turbans back into style during the ‘40s    Turbans were popular in the '50s as well, but were adapted to accommodate bouffant style hairstyles. Finding turbans with such classic and timeless designs of those past eras of fashion is nearly impossible nowadays - Or so I thought. Until one day I found an Etsy shop located Finland that recreated turbans from the '40s - '50s. I spoke to the owner: Enini Immonen. A milliner that wears turbans almost daily about her designs and why she deiced to dedicate her craft to turbans.    Q: Who did you first start designing? A: “Ever since I was a kid, I have always been creative with how I dress and look in general. After working in the service industry for several years, I decided to go to design school in 2012. After three years, I graduated as a seamstress and milliner. “  Q: How did you first become interested in vintage fashion? A: “I would guess that music has a part to play there. I have always been a fan of early rock ‘n roll from the ‘50s and of course,  the fashion and culture in that decade.”  Q: Why did you decide to make turbans? A: ”That is an easy question to answer: there’s a market for it - I also make other kinds of headwear, and clothing, but the turbans take up most of my time. Maybe the trend will change soon and I will start selling more of something else.”   Q: Which turban do you recommend buying the most? A: “That would be my ”Greta” turban since it's a little less ”loud” and it's also made out of stretchy fabric. But which turban you should wear is a personal choice based on your preferences and personal style.”  Q: Do you wear turbans yourself? A: “YES, YES a thousand times yes! I never leave home without one on.”  Q: Your turbans are very beautifully made and very unique and eccentric. Are they inspired by any specific star or style in the past? Or do you lean more on your imagination? A: “Both yes and no. A lot of inspiration comes from how women wore their hair during the ‘40s and ‘50s but I also let myself get inspired by the fabric itself.”  Q: Do you also take custom orders? A: “Yes, absolutely! It’s a nice break from everyday work when I can create something truly unique together with a customer.  Q: Any up and coming designs we can look forward too?  A: “You just have to keep watching and see what will come!”

Q: Who did you first start designing?
A: “Ever since I was a kid, I have always been creative with how I dress and look in general. After working in the service industry for several years, I decided to go to design school in 2012. After three years, I graduated as a seamstress and milliner. “

Q: How did you first become interested in vintage fashion?
A: “I would guess that music has a part to play there. I have always been a fan of early rock ‘n roll from the ‘50s and of course,  the fashion and culture in that decade.”

Q: Why did you decide to make turbans?
A: ”That is an easy question to answer: there’s a market for it - I also make other kinds of headwear, and clothing, but the turbans take up most of my time. Maybe the trend will change soon and I will start selling more of something else.”
Turbans are dated back to as far as the 18th century. In the 1940s, they were worn by everyone: from celebrities, to normal everyday women. When access to everyday things such as shampoo, conditioner, or hairdressers necesites was limited. In Old-Hollywood, turbans were often worn as a fashion statement rather than necessity. French milliner Madame Paulette, is often credited for bringing turbans back into style during the ‘40s    Turbans were popular in the '50s as well, but were adapted to accommodate bouffant style hairstyles. Finding turbans with such classic and timeless designs of those past eras of fashion is nearly impossible nowadays - Or so I thought. Until one day I found an Etsy shop located Finland that recreated turbans from the '40s - '50s. I spoke to the owner: Enini Immonen. A milliner that wears turbans almost daily about her designs and why she deiced to dedicate her craft to turbans.    Q: Who did you first start designing? A: “Ever since I was a kid, I have always been creative with how I dress and look in general. After working in the service industry for several years, I decided to go to design school in 2012. After three years, I graduated as a seamstress and milliner. “  Q: How did you first become interested in vintage fashion? A: “I would guess that music has a part to play there. I have always been a fan of early rock ‘n roll from the ‘50s and of course,  the fashion and culture in that decade.”  Q: Why did you decide to make turbans? A: ”That is an easy question to answer: there’s a market for it - I also make other kinds of headwear, and clothing, but the turbans take up most of my time. Maybe the trend will change soon and I will start selling more of something else.”   Q: Which turban do you recommend buying the most? A: “That would be my ”Greta” turban since it's a little less ”loud” and it's also made out of stretchy fabric. But which turban you should wear is a personal choice based on your preferences and personal style.”  Q: Do you wear turbans yourself? A: “YES, YES a thousand times yes! I never leave home without one on.”  Q: Your turbans are very beautifully made and very unique and eccentric. Are they inspired by any specific star or style in the past? Or do you lean more on your imagination? A: “Both yes and no. A lot of inspiration comes from how women wore their hair during the ‘40s and ‘50s but I also let myself get inspired by the fabric itself.”  Q: Do you also take custom orders? A: “Yes, absolutely! It’s a nice break from everyday work when I can create something truly unique together with a customer.  Q: Any up and coming designs we can look forward too?  A: “You just have to keep watching and see what will come!”

Q: Which turban do you recommend buying the most?
A: “That would be my ”Greta” turban since it's a little less ”loud” and it's also made out of stretchy fabric. But which turban you should wear is a personal choice based on your preferences and personal style.”

Q: Do you wear turbans yourself?
A: “YES, YES a thousand times yes! I never leave home without one on.”

Q: Your turbans are very beautifully made and very unique and eccentric. Are they inspired by any specific star or style in the past? Or do you lean more on your imagination?
A: “Both yes and no. A lot of inspiration comes from how women wore their hair during the ‘40s and ‘50s but I also let myself get inspired by the fabric itself.”
Turbans are dated back to as far as the 18th century. In the 1940s, they were worn by everyone: from celebrities, to normal everyday women. When access to everyday things such as shampoo, conditioner, or hairdressers necesites was limited. In Old-Hollywood, turbans were often worn as a fashion statement rather than necessity. French milliner Madame Paulette, is often credited for bringing turbans back into style during the ‘40s    Turbans were popular in the '50s as well, but were adapted to accommodate bouffant style hairstyles. Finding turbans with such classic and timeless designs of those past eras of fashion is nearly impossible nowadays - Or so I thought. Until one day I found an Etsy shop located Finland that recreated turbans from the '40s - '50s. I spoke to the owner: Enini Immonen. A milliner that wears turbans almost daily about her designs and why she deiced to dedicate her craft to turbans.    Q: Who did you first start designing? A: “Ever since I was a kid, I have always been creative with how I dress and look in general. After working in the service industry for several years, I decided to go to design school in 2012. After three years, I graduated as a seamstress and milliner. “  Q: How did you first become interested in vintage fashion? A: “I would guess that music has a part to play there. I have always been a fan of early rock ‘n roll from the ‘50s and of course,  the fashion and culture in that decade.”  Q: Why did you decide to make turbans? A: ”That is an easy question to answer: there’s a market for it - I also make other kinds of headwear, and clothing, but the turbans take up most of my time. Maybe the trend will change soon and I will start selling more of something else.”   Q: Which turban do you recommend buying the most? A: “That would be my ”Greta” turban since it's a little less ”loud” and it's also made out of stretchy fabric. But which turban you should wear is a personal choice based on your preferences and personal style.”  Q: Do you wear turbans yourself? A: “YES, YES a thousand times yes! I never leave home without one on.”  Q: Your turbans are very beautifully made and very unique and eccentric. Are they inspired by any specific star or style in the past? Or do you lean more on your imagination? A: “Both yes and no. A lot of inspiration comes from how women wore their hair during the ‘40s and ‘50s but I also let myself get inspired by the fabric itself.”  Q: Do you also take custom orders? A: “Yes, absolutely! It’s a nice break from everyday work when I can create something truly unique together with a customer.  Q: Any up and coming designs we can look forward too?  A: “You just have to keep watching and see what will come!”
Q: Do you also take custom orders?
A: “Yes, absolutely! It’s a nice break from everyday work when I can create something truly unique together with a customer.

Q: Any up and coming designs we can look forward too? 
A: “You just have to keep watching and see what will come!”

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